November Food of the Month

Fennel is a deliciously unique plant.  Both its bulb and its seeds are often used in cooking, yet have completely different tastes.  While the bulb is actually a member of the carrot family, its flavor and aroma resemble that of licorice!  The seeds, on the other hand, are often used in Italian cooking, such as sausages.

Just as both have different tastes, both have different nutritional contents.  The bulb is a good source of fiber, folate, potassium, and vitamin C, while the seeds are a good source of omega 6 fatty acids and manganese.  Therefore, to say fennel is a super food is an understatement!

Never tried fennel?  Now is the time to change that.  Fennel is at its seasonal peak in this part of the country in November.  Therefore, it should be abundant, fresh, and affordable!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

September Food of the Month

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Almonds: of all the nuts, we hear about almonds probably the most.  This is because of their heart healthy properties.  However, they are additionally a great source of protein, vitamin E, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, and copper.

These nutrients are important for a variety of functions, including: muscle development, skin health, development, metabolism, and immune function.  For example, magnesium is the second most abundant element in the human body, and makes up a large portion of bone composition.

Although almonds can be a healthy component of our diet, it is important not to overdo it.  One serving is approximately 23 almonds.  This is a small handful or about the size of a shot glass, which may not seem like a lot if you’re eating them plain out of the container.  The best way to control your portion is to mix them with other things such as trail mix or salads.  That way your small handful can be stretched into something more satisfying!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

August Food of the Month

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Zucchini is a nutritious option in season during the late summer and early fall months of the year.  It is a good source of heart healthy fats and vitamin C as well as vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and manganese, which are essential for metabolism, growth, and development.  Don’t forget: like most all fruits and vegetables, zucchini are also high in fiber.  Fiber is helpful for digestive health, weight loss, and lowering cholesterol among other functions!  Zucchini is one of the most versatile types of squash.  It can be included in numerous foods from muffins to shish kabobs to pastas to smoothies.  Explore a variety of recipes and don’t be afraid to think outside the box in the kitchen!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.