January 2016 Food of the Month

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Acorn squash are a great source of potassium, vitamins A and C, and fiber!  These nutrients can help keep your eyes and skin healthy.  They can also help to prevent diabetes and high blood pressure.  

Acorn squash were named because of their acorn-like shape.  They are in season all winter in this part of the country.  Use in soups, pastas, pies, ravioli, or stuff with brown rice and veggies.  And don’t toss the seeds.  Roast them in the oven with some herbs for a nutritious snack!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

 

November Food of the Month

Fennel is a deliciously unique plant.  Both its bulb and its seeds are often used in cooking, yet have completely different tastes.  While the bulb is actually a member of the carrot family, its flavor and aroma resemble that of licorice!  The seeds, on the other hand, are often used in Italian cooking, such as sausages.

Just as both have different tastes, both have different nutritional contents.  The bulb is a good source of fiber, folate, potassium, and vitamin C, while the seeds are a good source of omega 6 fatty acids and manganese.  Therefore, to say fennel is a super food is an understatement!

Never tried fennel?  Now is the time to change that.  Fennel is at its seasonal peak in this part of the country in November.  Therefore, it should be abundant, fresh, and affordable!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

October Food of the Month

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Pumpkin is a seasonal favorite for many, and not only as a decoration!  Pumpkin drinks, pumpkin desserts, pumpkin soups… the list goes on, but it is certainly a staple in the fall.  The nutrients contained are reason enough to consider it a staple, let alone the flavor.  Pumpkin is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium.  In fact, 1 cup of cooked pumpkin contains nearly two and a half times the amount of vitamin A the average person needs in one day!  Vitamin A is an essential nutrient that benefits our skin and vision.  This fall, serve up pumpkin frequently to get those extra servings of vegetables in.  That’s right, enjoy the pumpkin spice phenomenon!  Just be careful with portion sizes on the sweets.  Most anything in moderation.

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

August Food of the Month

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Zucchini is a nutritious option in season during the late summer and early fall months of the year.  It is a good source of heart healthy fats and vitamin C as well as vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and manganese, which are essential for metabolism, growth, and development.  Don’t forget: like most all fruits and vegetables, zucchini are also high in fiber.  Fiber is helpful for digestive health, weight loss, and lowering cholesterol among other functions!  Zucchini is one of the most versatile types of squash.  It can be included in numerous foods from muffins to shish kabobs to pastas to smoothies.  Explore a variety of recipes and don’t be afraid to think outside the box in the kitchen!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

July Food of the Month

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Who doesn’t love a fresh, juicy peach in the summer?  There are few foods more refreshing on a hot day in July.  Whether you just bite in to a whole peach or add it to a smoothie, this fruit will satisfy your taste buds and provide you with valuable nutrients.  Peaches, like many fruits, are high in fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium.  Vitamin C, in addition to warding off the common cold, can also relieve stress!  Peaches are freshest during the mid-late summer months in the Philadelphia area.  However, frozen peaches bought any time during the year will taste just as ripe because they are frozen just after harvested.  That means the frozen peaches you buy in the dead of winter are just as refreshing and nutrient-packed as the ones you buy now in July!

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

June Food of the Month

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Cherries are a nutrient-packed, flavorful fruit, high in fiber, omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids, vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium.  Together, these nutrients can benefit blood pressure control, digestive health, and heart health among other things.  A lot of people take omega 3 (fish oil) and/or omega 6 supplements for these health benefits.  However, these fatty acids are readily found in a variety of fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds, and herbs and spices in addition to seafood.  So save a few dollars and get these nutrients through foods such as cherries as opposed to buying extra supplements.  Cherries aren’t only delicious added to desserts.  They serve as a great addition to numerous meals such as salads, cereal, and chicken salad.

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.

February Food of the Month

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Sweet potatoes are nutrient-packed starchy vegetables.  Their bright orange color is from a pigment found in vitamin A, the same component in carrots that everyone tells you to eat to protect your vision. Vitamin A also keeps your skin young and healthy.  Sweet potatoes, compared to regular white potatoes, contain more fiber, calcium, copper, and vitamin C.  While white potatoes are not a bad choice, replacing items such as French fries, chips, baked and mashed potatoes with sweet potatoes is an easy way to pack a few more nutrients into your diet.  Sweet potatoes are at their peak in the Northeast during the winter season, making them a very affordable food this time of year.

Colleen Forrest, RDN, LDN
Spectrum Health Services, Inc.